New Trends on Human-Computer Interaction: Research, Development, New Tools and Methods

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Research, Development, New Tools and Methods

Cognitive models; Conceptual models; Mental models; Frameworks for cognition; Model-based design of interactive systems; Formal methods in human-computer interaction. Usability and user experience goals; User testing; User modeling; User profiling; Predictive models e. Smart environments for elders; Rethinking mobile interfaces for older users; Motion-based video games in care home settings; Interacting assistive approaches for elders; Detecting elderly emotion; Human-machine interaction for disabled users; Adult opportunistic device interactions; Elderly social interaction; Degrading skills adaptation for elderly interfaces; Robots collaboration for elderly emergency; Unmanned systems for elderly: Applications of ecological interface design.

Interaction paradigms; Mobile computing; Wearable computing; Location-aware computing; Context-aware computing; Ubiquitous computing; Pervasive computing; Transparent computing; Attentive environments; Virtual reality; Augmented reality and tangible bits; Immersive environments; Human-based computation; Visual languages and environments; End-user programming; Hypermedia advances and applications; New visions of human-computer interaction.

Interaction and interface design for people with disabilities; Interaction and interface design for the young and the elderly; Universal access and usability; Usability engineering; Usability testing and evaluation; Usability and internationalization. Fundamentals of human-robot cooperation; Cognitive models of human-robot interaction; Adaptable autonomy and knowledge exchange; Autonomy and trust; Awareness and monitoring of humans; Task allocation and coordination; Human guided robot learning; User evaluations of robot performance; Metrics for human-robot interaction; Long-term interaction robotics; Health and personal care robotics; Social Robotics; Multi-modal human-robot communication; Robot intermediaries; Experiments and applications.

Principles of agent-to-human interaction; Models for human-agent interaction; Social persuasion in human-agent interaction; Designing for human-agent interaction; Socially intelligent agents and the human in the loop; Agents for human-human interaction; Agent-based human-computer-interaction; Human cooperation and agent-based interaction; Human interaction with autonomous agents Agent-based human-robot interaction; Human and artificial agents emotional interaction.

Societal implications of human-computer interactions; Social computing and software Online communities Weblogs and other community building tools Online support for discovery and creativity; Tool support for discovery and innovation Expressive and attentive interfaces and environments Affective aspects of human-computer interaction Emotional design. Computer game technology; Computer game engineering; Foundations of computer game design and development; Development processes and supporting tools; Management aspects of computer game development; Architectures and frameworks for computer games; Game-based training and simulation; Serious games; Multi-user games; Online games; Online gaming; Game theories; Audio, video and text in digital games; New computer games and case studies; Performance improvements in computer games; Social impact of games and gaming.

Interactive systems for medical applications; Interactive systems for telemedicine; Interactive systems for telehealth; Interactive systems for telepathology; Interactive systems for telecardiology; Interactive systems for telesurgery; Interactive personal medical devices; Digital imagery and visualization frameworks; Role of colors and color imaging in medicine; Multidimensional projections with application to medicine; Data mining and image retrieval techniques for medical applications; Imaging interfaces and navigation; Internet imaging localization, retrieval and archiving; Video techniques for medical images; Internet support for remote medicine; Computer-controlled communications for medical applications; Medical informatics; Software and devices for patient monitoring; Interactive software for therapy and recovery.

Deadlines: Submission. Articles will be submitted to appropriate indexes. All received submissions will be acknowledged via an automated system.

ACHI Call for Papers

Final author manuscripts will be 8. The formatting instructions can be found on the Instructions page. Helpful information for paper formatting can be found on the here. Latex templates are also available. Your paper should also comply with the additional editorial rules. Once you receive the notification of contribution acceptance, you will be provided by the publisher an online author kit with all the steps an author needs to follow to submit the final version.

The author kits URL will be included in the letter of acceptance. We would recommend that you should not use too many extra pages, even if you can afford the extra fees.

The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.

No more than 2 contributions per event are recommended, as each contribution must be separately registered and paid for. At least one author of each accepted paper must register to ensure that the paper will be included in the conference proceedings and in the digital library, or posted on the www. Regular Papers up to page article -6 pages covered the by regular registration; max 4 extra pages allowed at additional cost- oral presentation These contributions could be academic or industrial research, survey, white, implementation-oriented, architecture-oriented, white papers, etc.

They will be included in the proceedings, posted in the free-access ThinkMind digital library and sent for indexing.

Human-Computer Interaction

Please submit the contributions following the instructions for the regular submissions using the "Submit a Paper" button and selecting the appropriate contribution type. Short papers work in progress up to 4 pages long oral presentation Work-in-progress contributions are welcome. These contributions represent partial achievements of longer-term projects. They could be academic or industrial research, survey, white, implementation-oriented, architecture-oriented, white papers, etc.

Please submit the contributions following the instructions for the regular submissions using the "Submit a Paper" button and selecting the contribution type as work in progress. Contributors must follow the conference deadlines, describing early research and novel skeleton ideas in the areas of the conference topics.


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The work will be published in the conference proceedings, posted in the free-access ThinkMind digital library and sent for indexing. For more details, see the Work in Progress explanation page. Ideas contributions 2 pages long oral presentation This category is dedicated to new ideas in their very early stage. Ideas contributions are intended for a debate and audience feedback. Please submit the contributions following the instructions for the regular submissions using the "Submit a Paper" button and selecting the contribution type as Idea.

For more details, see the Ideas explanation page. Extended abstracts 2 pages long oral presentation Extended abstracts summarize a long potential publication with noticeable results. It is intended for sharing yet to be written, or further on intended for a journal publication. Please submit the contributions following the instructions for the regular submissions using the "Submit a Paper" button and selecting the contribution type as Extended abstract.

The poster may be presented during sessions reserved for posters, or mixed with presentation of articles of similar topic.

Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) at Georgia Tech

This allows an author to summarize a series of results and expose them via a big number of figures, graphics and tables. Please submit the contributions following the instructions for the regular submissions using the "Submit a Paper" button and selecting the contribution type as Poster Two Pages. Also a big Poster is suitable, used for live discussions with the attendees, in addition to the oral presentation. The slides must have comprehensive comments.

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This type of contribution only requires a slide-deck. Please submit the contributions following the instructions for the regular submissions using the "Submit a Paper" button and selecting the contribution type as Poster slide-only. The slide-deck will be posted, post-event, on www. Also a big Poster is suitable, used for live discussions with the attendees, additionally to the oral presentation. Interviews are often avoided when the target user group is composed of cognitively and communication impaired people.

Recently, a trend to conduct interviews on-line using chat tools has also emerged.

An obvious consideration in this respect is that the used chat tool must be accessible and compatible with screen readers. Diary keeping is another ethnographically inspired method which provides a self-reported record of user behavior over a period of time Gaver et al. Participants are required to record activities they are engaged in during a normal day. Diaries allow identifying patterns of behavior that would not be recognizable through short-term observation.

However, they require careful design and prompting if they are to be employed properly by participants. Diaries can be textual, but also visual, employing pictures and videos. They have been successfully employed for user requirements elicitation in home settings with sensitive user groups, such as former psychiatric patients and the elderly Crabtree et al.

Reading and writing a paper-based diary may be a difficult process for the blind and users with motor impairments.

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Therefore, diaries in electronic forms or audio recorded diaries should be used in these cases. Brainstorming, originating from early approaches to group creativity, is a process where participants from different stakeholder groups engage in informal discussion to rapidly generate as many ideas as possible. Overall, brainstorming can be considered as appropriate when the users to be involved have good communication abilities and skills not necessarily verbal , but can also be adapted to the needs of other groups.

This may have implications in terms of the pace of the discussion and generation of ideas. Focus groups are inspired from market research techniques.


  1. New Trends on Human-Computer Interaction: Research, Development, New Tools and Methods.
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  5. They bring together a cross-section of stakeholders in a discussion group format. The general idea is that each participant can act to stimulate ideas, and that by a process of discussion, a collective view is established Bruseberg and McDonagh-Philp, Focus groups typically involve six to twelve persons, guided by a facilitator. Several discussion sessions may be organized.

    The main advantage of using focus groups for users with disabilities is that it does not discriminate against people who cannot read or write and it can encourage participation from people reluctant to be interviewed on their own or who feel they have nothing to say. During focus groups, various materials can be used for review, such as storyboards see section Scenario, Storyboards and Personas. This method should not be employed for requirements elicitation if the target user group has severe communication problems. Moreover, it is important that the discussion leader manages the discussion effectively and efficiently, allowing all users to participate actively in the process, regardless of their disability.


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    Focus groups have been used for eliciting expectations and needs from the learning disabled, as it was felt they would result in the maximum amount of quality data Hall and Mallalieu, They allow a range of perspectives to be gathered in a short time period in an encouraging and enjoyable way. This is important, as, typically, people with learning disabilities have a low attention span. Concerning older people, related research has found that it is not easy to keep a focus group of older people focused on the subject being discussed Newell et al. Participants tend to drift their discussions off the subject matter as for them the focus group meeting is a chance to socialize.

    Thus, it is important to provide a social gathering as part of the experience of working with IT researchers rather than treat them simply as participants. This technique was first applied to simulate age-related visual changes in a variety of everyday environmental tasks, with a view to eliciting the design requirements of the visually impaired in different architectural environments.